Click for larger image 40 Minutes
1986
Click for larger image 40 Minutes was a long-running strand on BBC2 which gave viewers a 40 minute insight into an aspect of British life.

Click for larger image 40 Minutes
1991
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Click for larger image All Our Working Lives
1984
Click for larger image A programme about mining, shown as part of a BBC4 evening dedicated to the production of power in the UK.

Click for larger image Antiques Roadshow
1983
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Click for larger image The Antiques Roadshow
2001
Click for larger image Antiques Roadshow: One of BBC1's most popular factual programmes for many years, this series was hosted by Hugh Scully for many years before Michael Aspel took over in 2000.

Click for larger image Antiques Roadshow
2010
Click for larger image Still going strong and now presented by Fiona Bruce, Antiques Roadshow is one of BBC1's top rated shows.

Click for larger image Arena
1975
Click for larger image Now the BBC's longest-running Arts strand, Arena began in 1975. The famous titles showing a floating bottle are now expanded to widescreen. The gorgeous theme, Another Green World, is by Brian Eno

Click for larger image BBC Media Arc
2001
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Click for larger image BBC Resources Idents
1998
Click for larger image BBC Resources was the commercial arm of the BBC's creative services across the UK including studios, graphic design, post production, audio, costumes and props. These idents were part of a set produced by BBC Resources to promote it's commercial activities to in-house producers and external production companies. Today most of the BBC's in-house creative and craft servies have been closed down.

Click for larger image BBC Select
1992
Click for larger image BBC Select was an overnight subscription service offering programmes of interest to special audiences (nurses, businessmen etc). Some programmes were scrambled Sky-style, others were free to air. At the start of each programme, the ident on the left appeared. Find out what services BBC Select was offering in mid-1993 by watching the promo on the right.

Click for larger image BBC Select Filler
1992
Click for larger image An excerpt from the BBC Select interval filler, the music was on a 10-minute loop.

Click for larger image BMTV
1989
Click for larger image BMTV - British Medical Television was an information service available by subscription aimed at GPs. BBC Enterprises launched a commercial venture offering providers the use of unused night time transmission hours. The venture was approved by the home office for a trial period of two years. Subscribers paying for the service would have a descrambler box which would automatically recognise the scrambled picture broadcast during the early hours of BBC2 and set the VHS recorder to record the programmes, so the subscriber could watch the following morning. Clip recorded by Roy Koning

Click for larger image Bodymatters
1986
Click for larger image This lightweight health education magazine show ran for three series, recorded in front of a studio audience and hosted by The Three Doctors... namely Dr Graeme Garden, Dr Alan Maryon Davis and Dr Gillian Rice; they were joined on occasions by Maggie Philbin for Bodymatters Roadshow.
 
The show is of interest for an early TV appearance by Victoria Beckham, dressed up as a piece of sperm on rollerskates. Go figure.


Click for larger image The Body in Question
1978
Click for larger image Jonathan Miller qualified as a doctor of medicine in 1959 and having dabbled in comedy and drama (the chilling 1968 Omnibus film of Whistle & I'll Come To You springs to mind, as does his 1966 celeb-fest Alice in Wonderland), he wrote and presented this thirteen-part series, which aired from 06/11/1978. It attracted controversy and devotion alike, the former the result of his dissection of a human body, the latter due to a gorgeous montage of antique clocks and paintings filmed at the Greenwich Observatory, accompanied by a memorable radiophonic vocoder score from Peter Howell, The Greenwich Chorus

Click for larger image Bradens Week
1968
Click for larger image Before That's Life there was Bradens Week

Click for larger image Breakfast Time - BBC Children's Programmes Exhibition
1982
Click for larger image A very young Bruce Hammal doing a presenting job on BBC Breakfast Time in a piece promoting a BBC exhibition taking place at Langham Gallery (Porland Place) commemorating 60 years of BBC children's programmes.

Click for larger image Celebdaq
2003
Click for larger image A showbiz news programme charting the rise and fall of celebrities, rating their celebrity worth in the form of a stock exchange.

Click for larger image The Computer Programme
1982
Click for larger image In the early 1980s the BBC embarked on a programme to educate us all about computers and a number of series were made as part of this plan such as this one, hosted by Chris Searle.

Click for larger image Crimewatch UK
1984
Click for larger image Hard to believe but Crimewatch was originally an experiment which was only to last for three programmes and very few police forces were willing to take part at first. By the end of 1984, many more police forces realised just how successful this programme had become and over the decades some of the country's nastiest villains have been captured as a direct result of calls to the programme.

Click for larger image Crimewatch UK
1987
Click for larger image CWUK's original presenting duo of Nick Ross and Sue Cook update us on the evening's calls. Don't have nightmares, do sleep well
 
left clip - opening titles
 
right clip - closing theme


Click for larger image Crimewatch UK
1988
Click for larger image Nick Ross is back with a new look Crimewatch UK in 1988

Click for larger image Crimewatch
1996
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Click for larger image Crimewatch UK
2003
Click for larger image That famous theme tune leads into an update from the Crimewatch team regarding the main shows appeals for help tracking rapists, muggers, burglars and armed robbers.  Don't have nightmares....

Click for larger image Crimewatch
2009
Click for larger image With Kirsty Young, after she replaced Nick Ross as host.

Click for larger image The Culture Show
2009
Click for larger image The Culture Show: BBC2's weekly look at arts and culture presented by Lauren Laverne.

Click for larger image Did You See?
1981
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Click for larger image Did You See?
1987
Click for larger image Ludovic Kennedy reviews the last week of TV

Click for larger image Eureka
1983
Click for larger image Inventions programme presented by Sylvester McCoy, Tomorrow's World Paul McDowell and apparently Jeremy Beadle. Wilf Lunn provided comic relief with disaster-prone useless inventions, including an exploding seagull-shaped hat.

Face to Face
1961
A legendary series of half-hour interviews, conducted by John Freeman between February 1959 and April 1962. Freeman never appeared on camera throughout the 35 shows; only his questions could be heard. His guests were filmed in tight close-ups under stark lighting conditions, as if under interrogation. Guests ranged from Lord Reith, Bertrand Russell and Martin Luther King to Adam Faith and Stirling Moss. This edition dates from February 1961 and features Tony Hancock. The titles were unique for every edition, illustrated by Feliks Topolski with images of the guest.

Face to Face
1995
The classic format was revived in the 90s, this time with Jeremy Isaacs as the off-camera interviewer. Here, Paul Eddington makes one of his final and most poignant TV appearances, to discuss the skin cancer which eventually claimed his life.

Click for larger image Film 79
1979
Click for larger image On this occasion, the holding slide to introduce the next programme does not come with the BBC1 holding slide ident. The programme in question, Roadshow Disco, is still 30 minutes away as first it's Barry Norman's weekly review of the film world.

Click for larger image Film 80
1980
Click for larger image With Barry Norman

Click for larger image Film 88
1988
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Click for larger image Film 91
1991
Click for larger image Barry Norman casts his critical eye over the latest films showing in cinemas.  The theme music that has become synonymous with the "Film" tv series is called "I Wish I Knew How It Could Feel To Be Free".

Click for larger image Film 93
1993
Click for larger image Same music, fresh set of titles.  Mr Norman still in the chair, reviewing whats coming up at the flicks.

Click for larger image Film 97
1997
Click for larger image Now on BBC2, another fresh set of titles, but still that famous music.  Bet you've tried to recognise the films in the opening sequence...i managed 1.

Click for larger image Film 99
1999
Click for larger image Jonathan Ross replaced Barry Norman in 1999 when Barry moved to BSkyB.

Click for larger image Film 2007
2007
Click for larger image The famous theme tune remixed for the 21st century with Jonathan Ross being the Barry Norman of the 21st century.

Click for larger image Film 2009
2009
Click for larger image Still in the presenters' chair after a decade, this was to be Jonathan Ross' penultimate year as presenter as he was to leave the BBC the following year following his involvement in the Sachsgate affair.

Five to Eleven
1988
A nasty variation on Jackanory, no doubt aimed at the bedridden, shown weekdays at 10.55am and requiring character actors to sit amid dying floral arrangements and give poetry readings via autocue. Philip Madoc is today's host... or victim?

Click for larger image Gaytime TV
1995
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Click for larger image Good Morning
1993
Click for larger image Since the creation of ITV's This Morning in 1998, the BBC has tried on numerous occasions to create a rival show. Good Morning turned up in 1993, and lasted for two years. Nick Owen and Anne Diamond were the hosts. The first series gave ITV a run for its money, but series two dropped showbiz guests in favour of 100% human interest, and this is what caused it to lose out in the ratings war. It was axed....

Click for larger image Homeground
2001
Click for larger image Series presenting documentaries and investigative programmes from around the BBC regions. This one, presumably from the South East region, remembers the story of the Lancastria. This episode aired on the 19th of July 2001.

Click for larger image Holiday '74
1974
Click for larger image Cliff Michelmore and John Carter wear their finest sports jackets to blend into the brown scenery as hosts of this 1974 edition of the Holiday programme, which feature Brits abroad on golden sands and in aqua-marine pools, intercut with numerous tight close-ups of female breasts bobbing about in bikini tops. This clip is taken from the 1992 edition of TV Heaven in which Frank Muir comments wrily on boob aethetics, in the light of 1974's drive for Women's Liberation.

Click for larger image Holiday
?
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Click for larger image Home Front
1997
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Click for larger image Horizon
1982
Click for larger image Another flagship show, comprising 50-minute documentaries on science, medicine and technology. Who would have thought it has been on air now for nearly forty years? The BBC website would have you believe it is a world leader in its field. But who cares?! Let's revel in these fantastic, evocative and memorable titles - seen in a 1982 edition on vintage Grand Prix cars - quite possibly the earliest British TV title sequence to be created entirely with computer graphics.

Click for larger image Horizon
c1989
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Horizon
1998
By way of contrast, a 1998 title sequence, from the edition "The Computer That Ate Hollywood". Reflections and stark colours are the order of the day here. Peter Capaldi narrates this film, about the increased use of CGI to create people and scenery in movies, with particular emphasis on James Cameron's recent blockbuster "Titanic".

Click for larger image Inside Story
1996
Click for larger image An ob-doc strand shown on BBC1 - a BBC1 version of 40 Minutes if you like. In case you were wondering, this episode followed the creation of short-lived boyband Upside Down.

Click for larger image The Late Show
1994
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London to Brighton in 3½ Minutes
1983
A train journey from London to Brighton, shot from the driver's cab using time-lapse photography, became a famous BBC 'intermission' film in 1953. This is the original transmission of the colour re-make, on 15/07/1983, marking the 50th anniversary of the electrification of the line and lasting 3½ minutes. The superb synthesized score and sound effects are by Kim McCroddan, while BBC1 announcer Tim Nichols narrates.

Man Alive
1966
Desmond Wilcox began his journalism career in 1949, and after a spell with the Daily Mirror and five years with Rediffusion's This Week, he joined the BBC in 1965 to become co-editor and presenter of this remarkable documentary series, made by a team which he later formed into the Man Alive documentary unit. Wilcox had a knack for exposing raw emotion in his contributors, though as a result his films were occasionally referred to around the corporation as "Desmond's Weepies".

Click for larger image Micro Live (Credits)
1985
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Modern Times
1996
The observational documentary strand on BBC2 during the mid-90s, which delivered of such memorable films as Lucy Blakstad's "The Lido", covering a day in the life of Brockwell Park Lido in South London and a cross-section of its clientele.

Click for larger image Motorfair 83
1983
Click for larger image Chris Searle and Sue Ingle are at Earls Court for Motorfair 1983.

Click for larger image Moviedrome
1992
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Click for larger image The National Lottery Live - 1st Programme
1994
Click for larger image On the 19th of November 1994, actor and comedian Gordon Kennedy ("Absolutely" and "Gregory's Girl") introduces the first ever National Lottery show before handing over to Noel Edmonds in a security lorry, heading for Television Center with the lottery machine and the cash!  (Unlikely as the machine would have already been installed in the studio for testing and the jackpot, at that point, would have been unknown).  What would Health and Safety say now to having a lorry driven into a studio with 400 audience members?
 
Trivia fans might like to know that the first draw jackpot, was around £7.3m, and was won by 7 ticket holders who won around £800,000 each.  Not bad eh?


Click for larger image Network
1989
Click for larger image BBC's version of Channel 4's Right to Reply

Click for larger image Noel Edmonds Late Late Breakfast Show
1982
Click for larger image A rather James Bond-ish looking Noel Edmonds zooms his way around in a Lambo and a speed boat in the titles to this light entertainment show, resplendant in a theme tune written by Gary Kemp and performed by Spandau Ballet.  The show was famous for its stunts involving members of the public, but resulted in disaster in 1986 when Michael Lush died from multiple injuries after a bungee stunt went horribly wrong.  The show was scrapped soon after and Noel went into hiding, only to resurface 2 years later with Noel's Saturday Roadshow.

Click for larger image Noel's House Party
1994
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Click for larger image Notice Board
1987
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Click for larger image Omnibus
1982
Click for larger image For its 1982 season, the BBC's flagship arts programme adopted a magazine format with Barry Norman as host. This was to last just one season as the programme returned to its single subject format the following year.

Click for larger image Omnibus
1983
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Click for larger image Omnibus
1993
Click for larger image With a decade still to run, Omnibus was still going strong in 1993. It was replaced in 2003 by a programme called "Imagine."

Click for larger image Ominbus
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Click for larger image The One Show
2007
Click for larger image Adrian Chiles and Christine Bleakley introduce Nationwide for the noughties. Theme composed by David Lowe

One Foot In The Past
1995
I always really admired this series, for making architecture and history so watchable, and for stoking up concern for heritage issues. The theme music is very touching, while the beautiful and apt title sequence shows an olde worlde model village being menaced by a bulldozer. This edition featured a report on the fight to save the last of Britain's police boxes, and followed Neil Pearson on a trip back to his old public school in Suffolk.

Click for larger image Open Space
1988
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Click for larger image Out of Court
1983
Click for larger image A BBC2 magazine show in which Watchdog collides with Rumpole of the Bailey... From the comfy scenario of a standard Beige Broadcasting Corporation set, Sue Cook and David Jessel guide us in a fun but earnest manner through the foothills and pitfalls of the legal world. Somehow I can't quite picture the target audience. Legal executives and trainee solicitors perhaps? Certainly not teenagers waiting for Monkey...

Click for larger image The Pam Ayres Easter Eggs-travaganza Show
1981
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Click for larger image The Paul Daniels Magic Show
1980
Click for larger image Don't watch the left clip if you suffer from "remembering annoying tunes" syndrome.  Yes, Paul Daniels is here with a special Magic Show.  You'll like it, not a lot...
 
Left Clip - Titles and THAT theme tune I warned you about Right Clip - Credits and THAT tune again


Click for larger image The Paul Daniels Magic Show
1984
Click for larger image "Meet the man who excels: Paul Daniels!" The famous magic show, hosted by a man who wore a hilarious toupee for many years, until he saw sense. His wife, the lovely Debbie McGee, was also the hostess. His most regular guest act was Hans Moretti, a strange and bizarre European circus performer with a large handlebar moustache.

Click for larger image Paul Daniels Christmas Show
1984
Click for larger image I'm sure that Debbie isn't late with her Christmas card these days as since 1998 he has been her biggest fan as it was in that year that Paul and Debbie married.

Click for larger image The Paul Daniels Magic Show
1985
Click for larger image Yes, he's back again with new titles and (thankfully) a new theme tune and a Golden Rose of Montreaux no less....

Points Of View
1962
Long ago, in a lime grove far away, Robert Robinson hosts the BBC viewers' letters show. No sign of the lick-over as yet, but his trademark "sexy for the times" dour demeanour is very much in evidence.

Click for larger image Points of View
1981
Click for larger image Oh no! "Triangle" has finished its current run!  Never mind, here's Uncle Barry Took to sooth your furrowed brow with his dulcit tones, and introduce more of your letters regarding BBC programmes.  Barry was a comic writer who wrote many classic radio comedies with his writing partner of many years, Marty Feldman.  Here, Uncle Barry shows us his Alfred Hitchcock impression in the opening monologue.

Points of View
1980s
From the classic era of Points of View, your friend and mine Barry Took introduces a selection of viewers' letters, sitting behind what appears to be a Bontempi organ in the corner of a nightclub. The title music is a wondrous radiophonic rendition of "When I'm Sixty-Four". Perhaps Barry, a former jazz musician, was playing it himself on the organ?

Click for larger image Points Of View
1983
Click for larger image Barry Took with another airing of your points of view.

Click for larger image Points of View
1989
Click for larger image Anne Robinson with letters at the ready to deliver more of your Points of View

Click for larger image Points of View
1993
Click for larger image Anne Robinson looking all sweet and demure before her "ability to make yogurt by staring at a pint of milk" phase kicked in, introduces letters complaining about the Cup Final and other BBC related grumbles.

Click for larger image Points of View
2005
Click for larger image Eamonn Holmes stands in for Terry Wogan in this clip from 2005...

Q.E.D.
1982
Q.E.D, a name derived from the Latin "Quod Erat Demonstrandum" or "That which was to be demonstrated" . In other words, a posh "How do they do that?" This edition examines at the craziness of Uri Geller.

Click for larger image Q.E.D.
1993
Click for larger image Another clip from the series, decked out in some new titles.

Click for larger image Rough Justice
1998
Click for larger image Rough Justice spent 25 years, from 1982 until 2007, investigating miscarriages of justice although by 1998 the programme was only broadcast on an ad-hoc basis.

Russell Harty's Christmas Party
1982
Journalist, chatshow host and travel broadcaster, Russell Harty lived on BBC2 and hosted a popular chatshow once a week. This Christmas 1982 edition features special guests Shelley Winters, Nicholas Parsons, Peter Davison, Sandra Dickinson, Shaw Taylor (as a Mexican dancer), plus the choir of St Paul's Cathedral and a bevvy of MPs at Westminster singing carols to their constituents. This clip is blighted by BITC alas...

Click for larger image Schofield's Europe
1990s
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Click for larger image Screenwipe
2006
Click for larger image TV critic, Charlie Brooker's Guardian newspaper column is brought to the small screen courtesy of BBC Four.

Click for larger image Seaside Special
c1977
Click for larger image Summertime variety from the BBC1 Big Top.

Click for larger image See For Yourself
1987
Click for larger image Marmaduke Hussey introduces the first of the BBC's Annual Report programmes.

Click for larger image See For Yourself
1989
Click for larger image Sue Lawley takes a behind the scenes look at the BBC and asks the questions on behalf of licence fee payers - whether the public is getting value for money.

Click for larger image See For Yourself
1991
Click for larger image Julian Pettifer presents a film which looks at the future of the BBC, whilst Esther Rantzen chaired questions from a studio audience.

Click for larger image Bite Back - See For Yourself
1992
Click for larger image This year Julian Pettifer presents the BBC Annual Report as a Bite Back Special. Director General Michael Checkland takes questions and answers from a studio audience.

Songs of Praise
1982
Michael Barratt, Nationwide hero, jets off to Manchester to moonlight as host of the BBC1 Sunday teatime church service. The venue for this service from October 1982 is Strangeways Prison, Manchester.
 
Right clip - another example of Songs of Praise from 1988


Click for larger image The Sky At Night
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Click for larger image That's Life Report
1980
Click for larger image This spin-off series would devote an entire episode to one specific consumer-related subject, which on this occasion was devoted to testing so-called miracle cures.

Click for larger image That's Life!
1991
Click for larger image From towards the end of its run, Esther Rantzen hosts the first programme of the 1991 series of That's Life.

The Time of Your Life
1983
From 15/07/1983, Noel Edmonds hosts an edition of his nostalgia series. Each week, he would invite a principal guest to recall a special time in their life - a good year, a career high, a personal triumph - and show clips to match. The particular month or year would be covered by secondary guests and clips as appropriate. In this edition, Jenny Agutter relives December 1970, along with David Frost and Jilly Johnson. Peter Bolgar is the BBC announcer in the continuity clip (right).

Click for larger image This Is Your Life
1960s
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Click for larger image This Is Your Life
1994
Click for larger image In 1994, This Is Your Life transferred from ITV to BBC1 and Michael Aspel, who had replaced Eamonn Andrews when Eamonn died in 1987, continued as host. The programme had originally been shown on BBC1 in the late 1950s and early 1960s before ITV transmitted the show for 25 years.

Click for larger image TV50: First 50 Years of BBC TV
1986
Click for larger image On Saturday 1st November 1986, the entire BBC1 evening schedule was given over to a mammoth "celebrity talking heads clip show", aimed squarely at viewers over the age of 39. All sorts of people from Joan Collins to Margaret Thatcher, and from Denis Healey to Kenny Everett, described their favourite all-time BBC shows. Ronnie Hazlehurst tossed off the opening theme tune, but it got much better after that - though I can't imagine why they kicked off the show proper with Gracie Fields singing "Wish me luck as you wave me goodbye..." A brilliant set of colour tube graphics makes up the TV50 logo. (Thanks to Louis Barfe)

Click for larger image Tomorrow's World
1976
Click for larger image It's Thursday night, it's 7pm... it's Tomorrow's World! This long-running science series aimed to give viewers a taste of exciting new inventions that would transform our lives, and was often broadcast live. Hosts during this classic 1970s era included Raymond Baxter and Michael Rodd, given a rousing intro by the terrific Johnny Dankworth theme tune. I love the way each letter of the logo is animated from different objects - flaming R's, frying O's, pill-popping S's and toasting T's; these titles take me right back to my daddy's knee! Click the pictures for enlargements.

Click for larger image Tomorrow's World
1983
Click for larger image This edition, shown on 17/03/1983, features the "brain" title sequence and a radiophonic theme tune composed by Richard Denton and Mark Cook that was first used on the 1980 series. Kieran Prendeville hosts the first item, about magnetic chucks for lathes; he was joined in this edition by Judith Hann and Maggie Philbin. Click the pictures for enlargements.

Click for larger image Tomorrow's World
1987
Click for larger image The fantastic theme tune introducing a live edition of the show.

Click for larger image Tomorrow's World
1990
Click for larger image A 1990 edition hosted by Judith Hann, Howard Stableford, Peter Macann and Kate Bellingham, which features the fantastic theme tune by Paul Hart, which was first used in 1986 - albeit with an edit at the point in which a butterfly appears over the CGI model of Macann's revolving head. In all the series ran for 38 years, from 1965 to 2003, and was axed as a result of falling ratings... Click the pictures for enlargements.

Click for larger image Tomorrow's World
1993
Click for larger image Here we have another clip from the long running sci-tech series with Howard Stableford and the usual co-hosts

Click for larger image The Tom O'Connor Roadshow
1987
Click for larger image The Tom O'Connor Roadshow was a weekday live variety show, which was shown on BBC 1 at lunchtimes.
 
(Apologies for the poor recording!)


Click for larger image Video Active
1987
Click for larger image Video Active was a series of 6 programmes presented by Sue Robbie. The series shows amateur videographers how to use camcorders and looked at ways of shooting visually interesting videos.

Click for larger image Video Nation Shorts
1995
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Click for larger image Watchdog
1987
Click for larger image Originally part of Nationwide and the short-lived Sixty Minutes, Watchdog became a programme in its own right in 1985. The programme followed a fifteen minute weekdays format in late 1986 and 1987 as part of the new BBC1 daytime line-up and was broadcast each weekday morning at 8.40am.

Click for larger image Watchdog
c1990
Click for larger image By 1990 the programme moved to a weekly slot but was still hosted by husband-and-wife team of John Stapleton and Lynn Faulds-Wood.

Click for larger image Watchdog
1999
Click for larger image Anne Robinson returned as presenter for the 2009 series.

Click for larger image Watchdog
2007
Click for larger image Nicky Campbell takes over the reigns for the consumer empowering show.

Click for larger image Watchdog
2009
Click for larger image After eight years away, Anne Robinson returned as one of the presenters of Watchdog in 2009.

Click for larger image The World About Us
8.11.1981
Click for larger image This BBC2 natural history series was initiated in 1967 by its then channel controller David Attenborough, and ran on the channel until 1986. As the first channel to embrace colour from 1967, the series was originally designed to present exciting and dramatic colour footage filmed by amateur cameramen, although the programme was eventually given a big budget and graduated to professional production values.

Click for larger image Whickers World
1984
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Click for larger image Who Do You Think You Are?
2009
Click for larger image BBC's family history programme, putting the art of tracing your family tree firmly into primetime.

Click for larger image Windmill
1985
Click for larger image Windmill was the name of a series which presented clips from the BBC archives which were linked by a specific theme. The programme was broadcast in the mid 1980s on Sunday lunchtimes for the four months that the Open University was closed.

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